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Posts tagged socialism

2 notes &

History is therefore the experience of Necessity, and it is this alone which can forestall its thematization or reification as a mere object of representation or as one master code among many others. Necessity is not in that sense a type of content, but rather the inexorable /form/ of events; it is therefore a narrative category in the enlarged sense of some properly narrative political unconscious which has been argued here, a retextualization of History which does not propose the latter as some new representation or “vision,” some new content, but as the formal effects of what Althusser, following Spinoza, calls an “absent cause.” Conceived in this sense, History is what hurts, it is what refuses desire and sets inexorable limits to individual as well as collective praxis, which its “ruses” turn into grisly and ironic reversals of their overt intention. But this History can be apprehended only through its effects, and never directly as some reified force. This is indeed the ultimate sense in which History as ground and untranscendable horizon needs no particular theoretical justification: we may be sure that its alienating necessities will not forget us, however much we may prefer to ignore them.
Fredric Jameson, The Political Unconscious (last paragraph of ch. 1; p. 102 in ISBN 978-0801492228)

Filed under critique quotes philosophy philosophy of history critical thinking capitalism ideology socialism Communism The Political Unconscious Fredric Jameson

0 notes &

The true soothsayers of our time are not hairy, howling outcasts luridly foretelling the death of capitalism, but the experts hired by the transnational corporations to peer into the entrails of the system and assure its rulers that their profits are safe for another ten years.
Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right, ch. 4 (p. 66 in ISBN 978-0-300-18153-1)

Filed under quotes politics 21st century capitalism corporatism money economics wealth British writers philosophy of history Communism Marxism privilege ownership profit Terry Eagleton books socialism

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awesomearchives:




On the run from the Nazis in 1940, the philosopher, literary critic and essayist Walter Benjamin committed suicide in the Spanish border town of Portbou. In 2011, over 70 years later, his writings enter the public domain in many countries around the world.


The article includes an interesting history of Benjamin’s work and links to where you can find the newly released material.

awesomearchives:

On the run from the Nazis in 1940, the philosopher, literary critic and essayist Walter Benjamin committed suicide in the Spanish border town of Portbou. In 2011, over 70 years later, his writings enter the public domain in many countries around the world.

The article includes an interesting history of Benjamin’s work and links to where you can find the newly released material.

(via dwellingmaps)

Filed under Walter Benjamin Marxism socialism Communism modernist writers aesthetics critique philosophy literature Jewish thought Judaism Kabbalah Frankfurt school

8 notes &

I caught glimpses of the great, the rich, the fortunate ones of all the earth living supinely upon the very best of everything and taking the very best for granted as their right. I saw them enjoying a special privilege which had been theirs so long that it had become a vested interest: they seemed to think it was a law ordained by nature that they should be forever life’s favorite sons. At the same time I began to be conscious of the submerged and forgotten Helots down below, who with their toil and sweat and blood and suffering unutterable supported and nourished the mighty princelings at the top.
Thomas Wolfe, You Can’t Go Home Again, ch. 46 (p. 560 in ISBN 0-06-080986-8)

Filed under American literature quotes Thomas Wolfe capitalism socialism literature modernism modernist writers privilege America labor consumption Helots

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'You sink it is so bad here now?—ze vay sings are wiz ze Party and zese stupid people? You sink it vould be better if zere vas anozzer party, like in America? Zen,' he said, not waiting for an answer, 'I sink you are mistaken, It /is/ bad here, of gourse, but I sink it vill be soon no better wiz you. Zese bloody fools—you find zem everyvhere. Zey are ze same wiz you, only in a different vay.' Suddenly he looked at George earnestly and searchingly. 'You sink zat you are free in America—no?' He shook his head and went on: 'I do not sink so. Ze only free ones are zese dret-ful people. Here, zey are free to tell you vhat you must read, vhat you must believe, and I sink zat is also true in America. You must sink and feel ze vay zey do—you must say ze sings ze vant you to say—or zey kill you. Ze only difference is zat here zey haf ze power to do it. In America zey do not haf it yet, but just vait—zey vill get it. Ve Chermans haf shown zem ze vay. … Zese people here—zey say zat zey are Nazis. I sink zat zey are more honest. In New York, zey call zemselves by some fine name. Zey are ze /Salon-Kommunisten/. Zey are ze Daughters of ze Revolution . Zey are ze American Legion. Zey are ze business men, ze Chamber of Commerce. Zey are one sing and anozzer, but zey are all ze same, and I sink zat zey are Nazis, too. You vill find everyvhere zese bloody people.
Franz Heilig in Thomas Wolfe’s You Can’t Go Home Again, ch. 39 (p. 504 in ISBN 0-06-080986-8)

Filed under 1936 America American literature Communism Germany Nazi Party Thomas Wolfe capitalism corruption critique democracy hypocrisy literature modernism modernist writers politics privilege quotes salon Communists socialism Daughters of the American Revolution

5 notes &

These words, which probably no one else, at least not in that precise form, would ever have said before, had the good fortune not to have lost each other, they had someone to bring them together, and who knows, perhaps the world would be a slightly better place if we were able to gather up a few of the words that are out there wandering around alone.
José Saramago, Seeing (tr. Margaret Jull Costa), ch. 18, p. 269 in ISBN 978-0-15-603273-5

Filed under José Saramago Marxism Portuguese writers language capitalism critique literature quotes socialism